Tag Archives: Ingrid Bergman

Quote (22)

“Happiness is good health and a bad memory”

– Ingrid Bergman

The Films Noirs In The 40’s

Well, now is the Films noirs‘ turn!

Like I’ve already said, the Film noir considered authentic, is from the 40’s and 50’s, where the considered as the first Film noir is “Stranger On The Third Floor” (1940) and the last one is “Touch of Evil” (1958), by Orson Welles. Between this period, were produced other movies, especially in the 40’s. Some of them are:

The Maltese Falcon” (1941), starring Humphrey Bogart, Mary Astor and Peter Lorre. This movie was called as “one of the biggest movies of all time” by the movies’ critical Roger Ebert and by the Entertainment Weekly magazine. Also was cited by Panorama du Film Noir Américain as the first big film noir of all. See the trailer:

Shadow of a Doubt” (1943), starring Joseph Cotten, Teresa Wright and Macdonald Carey, and directed by Alfred Hitchcock, is another big movie of this genre, considered an example of film noir. It’s also considered culturally relevant by the Congress Library from USA and selected as part of the collection from National Film Registry. The own Hitchcock declared that this movie is one of his favorites among those he directed. So, it’s good give a look in it:

In 1944, were produced important movies as “Double Indemnity”, starring Fred MacMurray and Barbara Stanwyck, directed by Billy Wilder; “The Woman In The Window”, starring Edward G. Robinson and Joan Bennett; “Laura“, starring Gene Tierney and Dana Andrews; “Murder, My Sweet“, starring Dick Powell and Claire Trevor…

Films Noirs 1944

Films Noirs 1944

In 1945, Hitchcock directed another film noir: “Spellbound”, starring Ingrid Bergman and Gregory Peck. This movie was the first one (in Hollywood) that treated about psychoanalysis. In the next year, Hitchcock directed “Notorious“, starring Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman.

In this same year, 1946, was produced one of the most famous film noir: “Gilda“, which was too audacious for that time. Starring Rita Hayworth and Glenn Ford, the main publicity of the movie was: “There never was a woman like Gilda…”. Give a look: